Yearly Archives: 2015
Friday, December 11, 2015

Presentationer från bränslecellskonferensen

A warm thank you to all participants in this year’s fuel cell conference!

The presentations are now available on Energiforsk’s website >>


Wednesday, December 9, 2015

SHC researcher winner of international energy storage contest

Professor Patrik Johansson and his team at Chalmers University of Technology was chosen as one of four winners of the open innovation contest on energy storage initiated by chemicals manufacturing corporation BASF. Johansson’s concept, which won almost one million Swedish kronor, is to develop aluminium-based batteries that are expected to store energy effectively and to a low cost.

122 entries were received for the international energy store competition announced by BASF at the beginning of the year. The challenge was to find new ideas for storing energy from renewable sources, keeping investment costs at a low level. Patrik Johansson is Associate Professor of Physics at Chalmers and active in the SHCS theme Energy storage which is currently, among other things, conducting a project on fast charging of large energy-optimized batteries.

Read the Chalmers article >>


Wednesday, December 9, 2015

SHC-forskare vinnare i internationell energilagringstävling

Professor Patrik Johansson and his team at Chalmers University of Technology was chosen as one of four winners of the open innovation contest on energy storage initiated by chemicals manufacturing corporation BASF. Johansson’s concept, which won almost one million Swedish kronor, is to develop aluminium-based batteries that are expected to store energy effectively and to a low cost.

122 entries were received for the international energy store competition announced by BASF at the beginning of the year. The challenge was to find new ideas for storing energy from renewable sources, keeping investment costs at a low level. Patrik Johansson is Associate Professor of Physics at Chalmers and active in the SHCS theme Energy storage which is currently, among other things, conducting a project on fast charging of large energy-optimized batteries.

Read the Chalmers article >>


Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Energy efficiency and safety put to test at AstaZero

SHC researchers from KTH defied the rough autumn weather to test their strategies in practice and obtain data for further research on energy consumption and safety.

In spring 2015, we wrote about Jenny Jerrelind and her colleagues who were then investigating energy efficient cornering strategies. The researchers developed control strategies for steering and propulsion of individual wheel motors which in turn were implemented in the KTH Research Concept Vehicle (RCV).

Now, the project, along with a sister project within SHC has received additional funding to carry out field tests on the test track AstaZero. During two days the scientists defied wind and rain to test their strategies in real situations.

How was test driving at AstaZero?
“It was the first time for us to perform measurements at AstaZero. It’s a very nice test facility with professional and friendly staff. Everything went well, although it is always a bit tense when running a test vehicle. The car has to be charged and all the measurement equipment checked. A lesson learned is that we should equip the RCV with lights. Now we had to run around with flashlights in the dark and rain since we performed measurements until nine o’clock at night. Sometimes you have to sacrifice yourself for the research, ha ha!”

Petter Tomner och Mikael Nybacka i RCV
Petter Tomner and Mikael Nybacka test how various faults affect the RCV and if their control strategies can help when faults occur. Photo: Jenny Jerrelind

What tests have you made?
“We made tests for the project I’m involved in, and a related project about fault handling. During the year, we have created simulation models of the RCV in order to produce cornering strategies adapted to it. Now we wanted to try out those control strategies during real driving. We drove straight ahead, in large circles as well as in slalom to evaluate the energy consumption in curves and get an estimation of how much it can be reduced.”

Three different control strategies were tested in the research vehicle – two with individual torque control at each wheel corner and one with four-wheel steering. Complementary tests were also run on a regular passenger car without corresponding control strategies. The energy consumption of the various strategies will be analyzed and compared.

Two research teams were present, doing tests on the same vehicle. How do you utilize each other’s knowledge and results?
“The second project is led by Mikael Nybacka and investigates how faults in the wheel motors for example, can be handled safely. During the test runs, they have focused on testing different control strategies for fault handling in order to assess their simulations. You could say that we have a common basis in the measurements we perform without any strategies. Based on those measurements I and my colleagues develop various energy efficient control strategies, while Mikael’s group consider control strategies for fault handling.”

What have you arrived at so far?
– It is too early to say yet. Analyzing the results will be very interesting. During winter we will develop the physical platform and develop the control strategies further both for fault handling and for energy-efficient driving. In spring we will perform additional tests.

About the projects
The field tests at AstaZero were funded by Vinnova.
The projects are conducted at KTH Vehicle Dynamics and are part of the Swedish Electric & Hybrid Vehicle Center (SHC). The experiments were performed on a test vehicle from the Integrated Transport Research Lab (ITRL) at KTH. For more information contact Jenny Jerrelind, phone +46 8 790 76 05 or email jennyj@kth.se.

Participants:
Evaluation of energy efficient cornering strategies using the KTH Research Concept Vehicle
Jenny Jerrelind
Lars Drugge
Mats Jonasson

Testing and evaluation of fault handling strategies in the KTH Research Concept Vehicle
Mikael Nybacka
Petter Tomner

Read more >>


Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Skarpa tester på AstaZero

SHC researchers from KTH defied the rough autumn weather to test their strategies in practice and obtain data for further research on energy consumption and safety.

In spring 2015, we wrote about Jenny Jerrelind and her colleagues who were then investigating energy efficient cornering strategies. The researchers developed control strategies for steering and propulsion of individual wheel motors which in turn were implemented in the KTH Research Concept Vehicle (RCV).

Now, the project, along with a sister project within SHC has received additional funding to carry out field tests on the test track AstaZero. During two days the scientists defied wind and rain to test their strategies in real situations.

How was test driving at AstaZero?
“It was the first time for us to perform measurements at AstaZero. It’s a very nice test facility with professional and friendly staff. Everything went well, although it is always a bit tense when running a test vehicle. The car has to be charged and all the measurement equipment checked. A lesson learned is that we should equip the RCV with lights. Now we had to run around with flashlights in the dark and rain since we performed measurements until nine o’clock at night. Sometimes you have to sacrifice yourself for the research, ha ha!”

Petter Tomner och Mikael Nybacka i RCV
Petter Tomner and Mikael Nybacka test how various faults affect the RCV and if their control strategies can help when faults occur. Photo: Jenny Jerrelind

What tests have you made?
“We made tests for the project I’m involved in, and a related project about fault handling. During the year, we have created simulation models of the RCV in order to produce cornering strategies adapted to it. Now we wanted to try out those control strategies during real driving. We drove straight ahead, in large circles as well as in slalom to evaluate the energy consumption in curves and get an estimation of how much it can be reduced.”

Three different control strategies were tested in the research vehicle – two with individual torque control at each wheel corner and one with four-wheel steering. Complementary tests were also run on a regular passenger car without corresponding control strategies. The energy consumption of the various strategies will be analyzed and compared.

Two research teams were present, doing tests on the same vehicle. How do you utilize each other’s knowledge and results?
“The second project is led by Mikael Nybacka and investigates how faults in the wheel motors for example, can be handled safely. During the test runs, they have focused on testing different control strategies for fault handling in order to assess their simulations. You could say that we have a common basis in the measurements we perform without any strategies. Based on those measurements I and my colleagues develop various energy efficient control strategies, while Mikael’s group consider control strategies for fault handling.”

What have you arrived at so far?
– It is too early to say yet. Analyzing the results will be very interesting. During winter we will develop the physical platform and develop the control strategies further both for fault handling and for energy-efficient driving. In spring we will perform additional tests.

About the projects
The field tests at AstaZero were funded by Vinnova.
The projects are conducted at KTH Vehicle Dynamics and are part of the Swedish Electric & Hybrid Vehicle Center (SHC). The experiments were performed on a test vehicle from the Integrated Transport Research Lab (ITRL) at KTH. For more information contact Jenny Jerrelind, phone +46 8 790 76 05 or email jennyj@kth.se.

Participants:
Evaluation of energy efficient cornering strategies using the KTH Research Concept Vehicle
Jenny Jerrelind
Lars Drugge
Mats Jonasson

Testing and evaluation of fault handling strategies in the KTH Research Concept Vehicle
Mikael Nybacka
Petter Tomner

Read more >>