Yearly Archives: 2016
Thursday, December 15, 2016

Reborn interest for fuel cells in the vehicle industry

Magnus Karlström
Magnus Karlström is researcher at Chalmers University of Technology and leads a global watch of energy-efficient road vehicles (OmEV) at SHC.

Swedish automotive industry shows a reborn interest in fuel cells. Hyundai’s and Toyota’s investments in the technology may be part of the explanation, says Magnus Karlström who was present at the conference Fuel Cell 2016, arranged by Technology watch of fuel cells. 

Hi Magnus! How was the conference?
It was really interesting. Fuel cells were hot in the early 2000s, and now I think we experience a reawakening of interest. Several of the project at the conference presented new knowledge, and we learned that the Swedish Energy Agency is planning a call for fuel cell research in the spring of 2017.

Read the full interview with Magnus Karlström on the Swedish page.

The program Technology watch of fuel cells is carried out within SHC’s framework and is coordinated by Energiforsk.


Monday, December 12, 2016

Doctoral students had a look into the Scania of tomorrow

SHC’s doctoral network gathered at Scania recently, to learn how the company works with electrification and what skills will be in demand in coming years.

Maria Taljegård
Maria Taljegård had some of her research questions answered at the study visit to Scania.

What competence will the big vehicle manufacturers look for in the future, and what skills will be necessary to develop tomorrow’s heavy vehicles? The answers to these questions can be essential for doctoral students considering a career in the vehicle industry.

When SHC’s doctoral network gathered at Scania’s site in Södertälje recently, the aim of the visit was to learn more about how vehicle manufacturer works with electrification and what skills will be in demand in the coming years. A group of about thirty doctoral students was received at Scania, for presentations of electric and hybrid technology, technology trends from the company’s perspective and a tour of the site.

One of the doctoral students who jumped at the opportunity to get her questions answered was Maria Taljegård, who does her PhD in Energy Technology at Chalmers.

“It was interesting to learn that Scania really sees electrification as a possibility, and that they look at both electric road systems, batteries and hydrogen”, say Maria Taljegård. “Since the presentations that we listened to touched several different aspects, I think that most of the participants got something out of the visit. As for me, I got answers to my questions about battery analysis and how Scania works methodologically with electric trucks.”

During the two-day meeting the group also had opportunity to network with each other, talk about their own research and do some “speed dating” to find new research contacts. Maria Taljegård explains that the network is an important platform for meeting doctoral students in the same research area and getting to know those who work at other universities.

“On this occasion I go to know two or three doctoral students that I may have further exchange with concerning my research”, she says.

SHC’s doctoral network welcomes all students from Swedish universities whose research is relevant to electric and hybrid vehicles and the surrounding infrastructure. The network members are invited to SHC’s events and PhD courses, and to recurring networking activities organized by project manager Fernanda Lodi Marzano, researcher at Uppsala University.

Want to become a member of SHC’s doctoral network? Read more >>

Text: Emilia Lundgren


Monday, December 12, 2016

Doktorander fick inblick i framtidens Scania

SHC’s doctoral network gathered at Scania recently, to learn how the company works with electrification and what skills will be in demand in coming years.

Maria Taljegård
Maria Taljegård had some of her research questions answered at the study visit to Scania.

What competence will the big vehicle manufacturers look for in the future, and what skills will be necessary to develop tomorrow’s heavy vehicles? The answers to these questions can be essential for doctoral students considering a career in the vehicle industry.

When SHC’s doctoral network gathered at Scania’s site in Södertälje recently, the aim of the visit was to learn more about how vehicle manufacturer works with electrification and what skills will be in demand in the coming years. A group of about thirty doctoral students was received at Scania, for presentations of electric and hybrid technology, technology trends from the company’s perspective and a tour of the site.

One of the doctoral students who jumped at the opportunity to get her questions answered was Maria Taljegård, who does her PhD in Energy Technology at Chalmers.

“It was interesting to learn that Scania really sees electrification as a possibility, and that they look at both electric road systems, batteries and hydrogen”, say Maria Taljegård. “Since the presentations that we listened to touched several different aspects, I think that most of the participants got something out of the visit. As for me, I got answers to my questions about battery analysis and how Scania works methodologically with electric trucks.”

During the two-day meeting the group also had opportunity to network with each other, talk about their own research and do some “speed dating” to find new research contacts. Maria Taljegård explains that the network is an important platform for meeting doctoral students in the same research area and getting to know those who work at other universities.

“On this occasion I go to know two or three doctoral students that I may have further exchange with concerning my research”, she says.

SHC’s doctoral network welcomes all students from Swedish universities whose research is relevant to electric and hybrid vehicles and the surrounding infrastructure. The network members are invited to SHC’s events and PhD courses, and to recurring networking activities organized by project manager Fernanda Lodi Marzano, researcher at Uppsala University.

Want to become a member of SHC’s doctoral network? Read more >>

Text: Emilia Lundgren


Wednesday, November 30, 2016

A solid base for Next Generation Battery research

robert-dominko_680px
Robert Dominko of NIC, Ljubljana gave a presentation on magnesium batteries.

Some hundred  participants attended the workshop “Next Generation Batteries” to learn more about tomorrow’s vehicle batteries. “We are building a solid base for further Swedish research and development”, says organizer Patrik Johansson.

While lithium-ion batteries still dominate the electric vehicle industry, other chemistries are emerging, often known as Next Generation Batteries (NGB). The interest from industry and academia for these chemistries is growing steadily, as was clearly seen at the  workshop “Next Generation Batteries” recently. About a hundred participants attended the event to learn more about tomorrow’s vehicle batteries.

“I am quite happy with the workshop as I saw many vivid discussions arise”, says Patrik Johansson, Professor at the Department of Physics, Chalmers, organizer of the workshop together with SHC.  He points out the need for arenas like SHC, to enable simple communication between academia and industry.

“The amount of optimism for NGBs is encouraging. With some needed reality checks we are building a solid base for further Swedish research and development.”

Both Swedish and international researchers presented their work with different battery chemistries during the day, among them Rosa Palacín from ICMAB-CSIC, Barcelona and Robert Dominko from  NIC, Ljubljana. Better access to resources for the main components, possibility of higher energy density and lower cost compared to lithium-ion batteries, were some of the arguments that were given for the development of NGBs. The vehicle industry’s view of NGBs was covered by a speech by Anna Teyssot from Renault.

“I give a sincere thanks to all the presenters for the way that they took on the task to present complex topics for a rather diverse audience”, concludes Patrik Johansson.

Further reading:
Magnus Karlström has written an extensive summary of the workshop in the newsletter OmEV (Swedish) >>

Text: Emilia Lundgren


Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Stadig grund för forskning på nästa generation batterier

robert-dominko_680px
Robert Dominko of NIC, Ljubljana gave a presentation on magnesium batteries.

Some hundred  participants attended the workshop “Next Generation Batteries” to learn more about tomorrow’s vehicle batteries. “We are building a solid base for further Swedish research and development”, says organizer Patrik Johansson.

While lithium-ion batteries still dominate the electric vehicle industry, other chemistries are emerging, often known as Next Generation Batteries (NGB). The interest from industry and academia for these chemistries is growing steadily, as was clearly seen at the  workshop “Next Generation Batteries” recently. About a hundred participants attended the event to learn more about tomorrow’s vehicle batteries.

“I am quite happy with the workshop as I saw many vivid discussions arise”, says Patrik Johansson, Professor at the Department of Physics, Chalmers, organizer of the workshop together with SHC.  He points out the need for arenas like SHC, to enable simple communication between academia and industry.

“The amount of optimism for NGBs is encouraging. With some needed reality checks we are building a solid base for further Swedish research and development.”

Both Swedish and international researchers presented their work with different battery chemistries during the day, among them Rosa Palacín from ICMAB-CSIC, Barcelona and Robert Dominko from  NIC, Ljubljana. Better access to resources for the main components, possibility of higher energy density and lower cost compared to lithium-ion batteries, were some of the arguments that were given for the development of NGBs. The vehicle industry’s view of NGBs was covered by a speech by Anna Teyssot from Renault.

“I give a sincere thanks to all the presenters for the way that they took on the task to present complex topics for a rather diverse audience”, concludes Patrik Johansson.

Further reading:
Magnus Karlström has written an extensive summary of the workshop in the newsletter OmEV (Swedish) >>

Text: Emilia Lundgren